A new legend

Unauthorized is very, very pleased to announce that MADE BY JIMBOB has joined the intellectual outlaws of the Internet. Look for his videos on the Made by Jimbob channel, which will be coming soon to UATV.

And check out his appearance today on the Big Bear’s livestream, where he made an interesting connection between the concepts of logos and the corrupt distilling of the human spirit into the corporate logo.


Unauthorized welcomes St. Efan

Unauthorized.TV is very pleased to announce that St. Efan himself, Stefan Molyneux, has joined UATV. Not only will his videos be available to UATV subscribers, but he is already producing UATV-exclusive content, including his very first video: The Terrible Truth About the Shooting of Daunte Wright.

Stefan is one of the most highly regarded philosophers on the ideological Right, and an undaunted truthseeker who does not hesitate to confront some of the greatest shibboleths of our time. His intellectual pursuit of the truth has cost him dearly, as he may be the third-most-deplatformed individual after Milo and Owen, having been banned from Patreon, Paypal, Twitter, and YouTube, just to name a few of the converged platforms that have pronounced him anathema.

As such, St. Efan is without question highly unauthorized by the thought police, he is the perfect addition to the collection of intellectual outlaws who presently make up Unauthorized. If you would like to support Stefan’s Unauthorized channel, you can subscribe to it here. And if you are already a UATV subscriber and happen to be active on Gab, you may wish to note his announcement on joining UATV there.

UPDATE: A subscriber asks how to support multiple creators:

I’ve been a Feed the Bear subscriber of UATV since it was launched and have been quite pleased with the content and the creators. I am delighted that Stefan Molyneux has joined, as I had been hoping that he would come on board since the inception of UATV. To get to the point, I would like to support Stefan, Razorfist and Dr. Brown in addition to the big bear but don’t see a way to add subscriptions for them. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Subscriptions are connected to emails. So, you can take out another subscription with a different email. Eventually we will add the ability to have multiple subscriptions per account/email, but that is not a top priority at the moment.


Netherflix is losing its lead

Netherflix’s market share has fallen by one-third:

Netflix lost 31 per cent of its market share over the last year despite adding more than 36 million new users as its competitors gain steam

Despite adding more than 36 million new users, Netflix’s US market share took a tumble from 29 per cent to 20 per cent, representing a 31{3549d4179a0cbfd35266a886b325f66920645bb4445f165578a9e086cbc22d08} drop since 2020 

Amazon Prime Video is in a comfortable second place with 16 per cent of market

Hulu barely made it to third place at 13 per cent while HBO Max is hot on the company’s heels with 12 per cent

Disney+ rounds out the top five streaming services in fifth place with 11 per cent

The leftover 28 per cent of the market is made up of services like Apple TV+, Starz, Paramount+, and others.

UATV has only a very tiny fraction of the market, but we’re growing. The second test of livestreaming was successful last night, and I just received the rough cut of UATV’s first original documentary, which will be available on UATV soon. The Devil doesn’t have all the good music and soon he won’t have all the good video either. 


The Voice of Saruman

The Forge of Tolkien Episode 20, THE VOICE OF SARUMAN, is now on UATV.

Standing at the base of the Tower of the Cunning Mind, Gandalf warned Pippin and the others to beware of Saruman’s voice—but what power did Saruman of Many Colours have over the company, if his most dangerous weapon was his speech?

In this episode, recorded on the feast of the Epiphany, Professor Rachel Fulton considers what Tolkien reveals about the dangers of trusting politicians by way of his characterization of Saruman and Gandalf as “messengers” of a particular kind. What kind of creatures were the Istari, and why did they have the powers—and limitations—that they did to influence events in Middle-earth? What does Saruman’s temptation and fall reveal about the meaning of Power, and how did Gandalf defeat such a powerful foe?

In other Unauthorized news, Razorfist has brought his Metal Mythos music documentary series to UATV, which videos are now being featured in their own eponymous channel.


The Olde Speech

 The Forge of Tolkien episode 19, THE OLDE SPEECH, is now available on #UATV.

In December 1954, Hugh Brogan wrote to Tolkien to complain about the “archaizing” style of parts of The Lord of the Rings, particularly the chapter “The King of the Golden Hall.” Tolkien drafted his response but never sent it, deferring a proper discussion to a time when they could meet in person. When is archaizing “tushery,” and when is it necessary? What is the difference between a bogus and a genuinely “antique” turn of phrase? 

In this episode Professor Rachel Fulton Brown reads the “linking” passage in The Book of Lost Tales taking Eriol from the hall of the Tale-fire to Rumil’s garden to illustrate Tolkien’s process in discovering his proper style. What did Tolkien mean when he told Brogan he found it easier to think in an archaic mode, and why did he chide Brogan for his “parochialism of time”? Hint: The distance is as great as that between Globe Earth and Flat Earth! 


AROUND THE TALE-FIRE

The Forge of Tolkien Episode 18, AROUND THE TALE-FIRE, is now available to subscribers on #UATV.

“Now it happened on a certain time that a traveller…” What do we find when we set out on the journey to Faërie? 
In this episode, Professor Rachel Fulton Brown opens the door to the Cottage of Lost Play and welcomes the folk and the children to gather round the “Tale-file blazing in the Room of Logs” to hear stories of the Elder Days when England was known as Tol Eressëa and the towers of Kortirion could be glimpsed in Warwick. What do we make of Tolkien’s archaic pseudo-Biblical language and his Tennysonian verse in his earliest attempts at writing his legendarium? Why is it so hard to craft a convincing tale? And which song do we find ourselves in?
Also available now is Episode 5 of Pinkerton’s Ghosts, THE POP-STAR’S MUSE.

THE OLDE SPEECH

    Title: “Episode 19: The Olde Speech” [with the -e in Olde!]

    Blurb: In December 1954, Hugh Brogan (then age 18) wrote to Tolkien to complain about the “archaizing” style of parts of The Lord of the Rings, particularly the chapter “The King of the Golden Hall.” Tolkien drafted his response but never sent it, deferring a proper discussion to a time when they could meet in person. When is archaizing “tushery,” and when is it necessary? What is the difference between a bogus and a genuinely “antique” turn of phrase? In this episode Professor Rachel Fulton Brown reads the “linking” passage in The Book of Lost Tales taking Eriol from the hall of the Tale-fire to Rumil’s garden to illustrate Tolkien’s process in discovering his proper style. What did Tolkien mean when he told Brogan he found it easier to think in an archaic mode, and why did he chide Brogan for his “parochialism of time”? Hint: The distance is as great as that between Globe Earth and Flat Earth! 


On Fairy Stories

Episode 17 of The Forge of Tolkien, ON FAIRY STORIES is now live on Unauthorized, featuring the newest Presidential appointee to the Federal Cultural Property Advisory Committee, Professor Rachel Fulton Brown.

In 1938, Tolkien gave a lecture at St. Andrew’s University on the topic of “fairy stories,” ostensibly meaning to explain what “fairy stories” were. In the course of the lecture, however, Tolkien spent more time explaining what they weren’t—travelers’ tales, beast fables, dreams, children’s stories—than, it would seem, explaining what they were. Why did Tolkien find it so hard to define fairy stories other than in the negative? What was he thinking of when he defined them not as stories about fairies, but as stories about “Faërie,” aka the Perilous Realm?

In this episode, Prof. Rachel Fulton Brown reads the published version of Tolkien’s lecture for clues about what Tolkien intended his own fairy stories to achieve. We pull back the veil of Fantasy to learn why real fairy stories have happy endings—and why our reading of Tolkien’s own stories has only just begun.


The Junior Classics on Unauthorized

We’ve launched a new channel on UATV. It features dramatic readings of classic tales from the Junior Classics by the Junior Classic Podcast. Two episodes are already available on the Junior Classics channel and a new episode will be added every week.

And don’t forget the Pinkerton’s Ghosts channel, which presently features three episodes and also appears on a weekly basis. As Unauthorized grows, we will be adding original video documentaries beginning next year, and we hope to eventually begin producing video dramas once we have the necessary resources.

If you want to help build it, you know what to do. And if you already are, thank you very much.


Magic Words

The Forge of Tolkien Episode 16, MAGIC WORDS, is now live on #UATV

Enter Faerie, and you expect enchantment—the power of words, spoken or sung, to transform the world. But how can (or should) a Christian author invoke such spells without falling into the very temptations that the Ring or other magical devices like mirrors and palantiri would warn us about? In this episode, Professor Rachel Fulton Brown questions the role of magic words in fantasy literature generally and Tolkien specifically. Tolkien’s understanding of the power of the adjective is contrasted with the power of naming (Ursula LeGuin) and “root hunting” (Robert Graves), both of which are read in the context of one famous medieval book of word spells, The Sworn Book of Honorius (“Liber Iuratus Honorii”). Is there such a thing as “good” magic? How do spells differ from prayer? What role ought naming play in the Christian response to creation? 

In memoriam JOY, the best dog ever (November 8, 2019-October 28, 2020) Recorded as she lay at my feet. Her name was her truth, my joy. RIP.